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Improving Teen Driving Behaviors

Through the analysis of naturalistic and simulated driving data, the Teen Driver Safety Research team at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute is working to reduce the frequency and severity of crashes involving teen drivers. Our researchers are conducting a number of studies to assess the driving skills of newly licensed teens, how various driving scenarios affect teen driving behaviors and emotions, and how interventions affect teen driving behavior and skill level. The following projects are currently underway: 

  • Maturation of Driving Skill from Teen to Young Adult to Experienced Adult Using SHRP2 Naturalistic Data

Young adult drivers should exhibit improved driving behavior compared to teen drivers due  to increased driving experience. However, previous naturalistic driving data suggests otherwise. This study will identify the specific predictors of crashes and near crashes among young drivers and determine if these predictors vary across age and skill level using SHRP2 Naturalistic Data. The specific aims are to:

-- categorize and quantify the factors contributing to young adult crashes and near crashes

 -- compare young adult drivers with previously analyzed novice teen and experienced adult  SHRP2 data

For more information on this study, please contact Thomas Seacrist, MBE at (267) 426-5432 or seacrist@email.chop.edu.

This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC).

  • Emergency Autonomous to Manual Takeover in Driving Simulator: Teens vs. Adult Drivers

This study’s objective is to introduce teen and adult drivers to autonomous driving and to assess their ability to remain vigilant and to promptly take over in the case of a failure of the autopilot.  The study aims to:

-- analyze both novice and experienced drivers' pre- and post-impressions of the self-driving mode

-- quantify the ability of drivers, both novice and experienced, to remain vigilant when driving in a self-driving mode through the use of an eye tracker

-- assess the human aptitude to regain control in an emergency and to compare teen and adult reactions

For more information on this study, please contact Helen Loeb, PhD, at loebH@email.chop.edu.

This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC). - See more at: https://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/chop_young_driver_research_teen_driving_behaviors#sthash.xMYYE3Iy.dpuf

This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadephia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Injustry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC).

  • Driving Analytics: Comparison of Teen and Adult Naturalistic Driving Behavior Patterns

This three-year study will lead to a better understanding of the adult and teen driver behaviors that lead to crashes, as well as the specific reactions of these drivers (such as swerving or braking) in emergency situations. For this project, researchers are analyzing the video and data of over 11,000 crashes, near crashes, and baseline events from the SHRP2 Naturalistic Driving dataset. Results will help manufacturers design Active Safety systems (Forward Collision Warnings, Lane Departure Warnings) that will ensure safety while minimizing false alarms.

For more information on this study, please contact Helen Loeb, PhD, at loebH@email.chop.edu.

This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadephia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Injustry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC).

  • Teen Outreach Program Evaluation for Driving Safety

CHOP researchers have recently collaborated with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to develop tools to facilitate the evaluation and enhancement of safe driving programs for teens. The two-year project included stakeholder interviews in the community, review of existing programs both within the state and across the nation, and interactive workshops with traffic safety professionals.

The final product of this collaborative work was the development of several important resources, including a comprehensive Program Planning & Evaluation Guide and the CHOP Program Planning and Evaluation YouTube Channel. These resources are intended to support Pennsylvania Community Traffic Safety Program staff to identify their community’s traffic safety issues and needs, leverage that information to develop programs to maximize program impact, and measure the impact of their programs to guide future programming. These materials cover teen driving safety topics but are applicable for a wide range of safety and other public health topics. Read more about the research.

For more information on this study, please contact Linda Fleisher, PhD, MPH at fleisherl@email.chop.edu.

This project is supported by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

For more information on this study, please contact Helen Loeb, PhD, at loebH@email.chop.edu.

This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC). - See more at: https://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/chop_young_driver_research_teen_driving_behaviors#sthash.xMYYE3Iy.dpuf

This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadephia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Injustry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC).

- See more at: https://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/chop_young_driver_research_teen_driving_behaviors#sthash.GGW3Z7Gu.dpuf
This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC). - See more at: https://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/chop_young_driver_research_teen_driving_behaviors#sthash.xMYYE3Iy.dpuf

For more information on this study, please contact Helen Loeb, PhD, at loebH@email.chop.edu.

This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC). - See more at: https://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/chop_young_driver_research_teen_driving_behaviors#sthash.xMYYE3Iy.dpuf

This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at The Children's Hospital of Philadephia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Injustry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC).

- See more at: https://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/chop_young_driver_research_teen_driving_behaviors#sthash.GGW3Z7Gu.dpuf

 

teen driving sibling

Learn more about our
Safe Driving Assessment Research

Learn about our
Distracted Driving Research

Read more about CHOP's SDA research:

- See more at: http://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/teen_driving_skills_acquisition_and_training/researcher#sthash.4btHM5Cr.dpuf

Further reading:

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