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History of National Teen Driver Safety Week 

Motor vehicle crashes remain the primary cause of death for adolescents. Teen drivers (ages 16 to 19) are involved in fatal crashes at four times the rate of adult drivers (ages 25 to 69). Each year, more than 5,000 teens are killed in motor vehicle crashes.

After a series of tragic crashes involving Pennsylvania high school students, Representatives Charlie Dent (R- PA) and Senator Bob Casey (D- PA) and over 50 co-sponsors introduced the resolution creating National Teen Driver Safety Week in October 2007. The initiative was supported by the traffic safety experts at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company. National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) is conducted annually during the third week of October in the United States.

Last year's theme was  'It Takes Two: Shared Expectations for Teens and Parents for Driving.' While a teen is learning to drive and during the first year of independent driving, it takes a parent and a teen working together to develop a safe skilled driver.

Support for National Teen Driver Safety Week has grown, and media coverage has been great. Celebrities, including Jesse McCartney and Oprah Winfrey, have formally endorsed the week, and Kellly Clarkson got involved during last year's NTDSW. U.S. Transportation Secretary LaHood acknowledged distracted driving as an epidemic, calling for Americans to turn off their phones while driving, prior to the week’s kickoff in 2010. State and local officials across the country have also implemented programs and campaigns as part of NTDSW.

The next National Teen Driver Safety Week will take place October 19-25, 2014.

female teen driver

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