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Get Behind National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW)

National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) takes place on October 19-25, 2014. This year's theme is  ‘Supporting Older Novice Drivers: Building Awareness of a Steady Trend in Delayed Licensure.’ About one-third of all drivers, including more than 60 percent of teens from lower income areas, are not licensed by age 18. By age 21, about 20 percent of all teens and more than 60 percent of youth in lower income areas are still not licensed. At least one in three teens that eventually become licensed do so without the protective benefits of Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL), beyond basic learner requirements.

Teens delay getting their license for mostly economic reasons rather than to avoid GDL requirements or restrictions. In a national AAA survey of teens, the biggest reasons cited for delaying licensure were related to opportunity, costs, and motivation, with fewer than 1 in 4 teens citing reasons related to special driving restrictions or requirements for younger new drivers in their decision to delay licensure.

  • not having a car (44 percent)
  • ability to get around without driving (39 percent)
  • cost of gas (36 percent)
  • cost overall (36 percent)
  • just didn’t get around to it (35 percent)


If you or a friend are not yet licensed, here's what you should know:

  • It’s okay to delay licensure until you are ready to begin the process of learning to drive and can afford the costs. It’s a very responsible and practical decision.

  • If you decide to delay licensure, create your own personal GDL. In most states if you decide to get your license after your 18th birthday, you will need to create your “Personal GDL” because you are a novice driver no matter when you start. Base your “Personal GDL” on your behind-the-wheel time and progress in gaining safe driving skills. Take ownership of your learning-to-drive process to reduce your risk of crashing. Be sure to:
    Prepare as if you are getting a learner permit. Read up on your state's traffic laws and know the stages of Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL). (Click here to learn more.)
    Consider getting behind-the-wheel training with a professional. (Click here for tips on how to choose a driving school.)
    Designate an experienced licensed adult driver or two to supervise your early driving until both of you feel comfortable with your driving performance in many different driving environments. This involves between 50 and 120 hours of adult-supervised practice. (Click here to learn more.)
    Follow supervised practice with independent driving under less risky conditions before you drive in higher risk conditions. Continue to enlist a licensed adult to ride along as a passenger to support safe driving behaviors and to provide guidance in difficult driving situations like in heavy city traffic or construction zones until you both confident that you can drive them safely on your own. (Click here to learn more.)

  • Support advocacy efforts to extend the minimum age requirement of GDL in your state to protect older novice drivers and others with whom they share the road. Now that you understand the potential risks and challenges with getting licensed without a state mandated GDL, help others be safe novice drivers as well:
    Advocate for your state to extend the intermediate licensure period to include teens up to age 21. Ideally, the stages of GDL should apply to all novice drivers regardless of age (with room for relaxing some rules for adults). 
    Share your ideas on Facebook at RideLikeAFriend and on Twitter @safetymd #teendriving2014.

 

parent as driving teacher

 

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Further reading:

- See more at: http://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/help_create_positive_change/teen#sthash.AG8BNAvO.dpuf

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Further reading:

- See more at: http://www.teendriversource.org/more_pages/page/help_create_positive_change/teen#sthash.AG8BNAvO.dpuf
 

SPREAD THE WORD!
Get your friends involved in creating a National Teen Driver Safety Week campaign at your school that supports older novice drivers. For campaign ideas, visit the Ride Like A Friend. Drive Like You Care Facebook page. To help other teens do the right thing as a passenger and a driver, learn about messaging to motivate.

Follow Ride Like  
A Friend on:

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Support advocacy efforts to extend the minimum age requirements of GDL in your state to protect older novice drivers and others with whom they share the road. Now that you understand the potential risks and challenges with getting licensed without a state mandated GDL, help others be safe novice drivers as well:

  • Advocate for your state to extend the intermediate licensure period to include teens up to age 21. Ideally, the stages of GDL should apply to all novice drivers regardless of age (with room for relaxing some rules for adults).

 


Remind your parents that they’re your role models for safe driving behavior. Share this link about what they can do for National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) with them!

 

Further reading:

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