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Post-license Safety-positive & Safety-negative
Teen Driving Behaviors
 

The Teen Driver Safety Research team at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute is working to reduce the frequency and severity of crashes involving teens behind the wheel. The following projects are currently underway: 

  • Realistic Simulation in a Driving Simulator
    Although a moderate level of stress is common in everyday driving, excess stress can undermine the physical and psychological ability of drivers to safely control vehicles. In turn, this increases the likelihood of accidents and a higher number of traffic violations. Due to these safety risks, it is critical to understand how stressors affect drivers and how their stress reactions impact their driving behaviors in a variety of stressful situations. The project will create and validate a paradigm for reliably inducing stress and then measure the effect of stress on novice drivers' performance. We will utilize our high-fidelity driving simulator for the project, which has the look and feel of a real car and allows us to study driver behavior in a safe and controlled environment.

    For more information on this study, please contact Yi-Ching Lee, PhD, at (267) 426-5217 or LeeY1@email.chop.edu.

    This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC).

  • The Effect of Distraction on Teen Driving Performance in an Emotionally Realistic Driving Simulator
    Cell phones and other infotainment devices are very popular with young drivers. How do these novice drivers use these devices while driving? How do they manage controlling the car, watching the road, and talking on the phone? This project will examine how newly licensed drivers interact with realistic traffic situations while performing a cognitively demanding task in a driving simulator. We will look at how the drivers manage and prioritize multiple tasks and associate driver performance with self-report measures on cognitive flexibility and risk perception.

    For more information on this study, please contact Yi-Ching Lee, PhD, at (267) 426-5217 or LeeY1@email.chop.edu.

    This project is funded by the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and The Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC).

  • Educational Gaming for Teen Driver Safety
    This project will develop a gaming environment that promotes the use of healthier, safer behaviors among teen drivers and peer passengers. Teen drivers are at an elevated risk of being involved in a fatal motor vehicle crash, and the presence of peer passengers significantly increases this risk. Developing an evidence-based gaming environment that allows teens to acquire the necessary knowledge about having peer passengers and practice to support the adoption of healthy, safe behaviors will substantially impact the overall well-being of both teens and other drivers. The proposed gaming platform will translate research into practice, incorporate theoretically important concepts in driving safety, and provide a safe practice environment for teen drivers and peer passengers.

    For more information on this study, please contact Yi-Ching Lee, PhD at (267) 426-5217 or LEEY1@email.chop.edu.

    This study is funded by the National Science Foundation -- Small Business Technology Transfer Program.

  • Examining Cognitive Variables and Decision-making Strategies Related to Adolescent Driver Performance
    When in the car with friends, teen drivers often make quick decisions in the heat of the moment, either engaging in safe or unsafe behaviors. The purpose of this prospective study is to determine psychological and behavioral factors that may be associated with young drivers' risk-taking or risk-reducing behavior when peers are passengers.

    For more information on this study, please contact Jessica Mirman, PhD at (267) 426-6854 or mirmanj@email.chop.edu.

    This study is funded by the  Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and the Ohio State University, a multi-site National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC).

 

teen driving sibling

Read about CHOP's Simulated Driving Assessment (SDA) research:

Investigators Take Clinical Look at Teen Driver Safety
Research Tool Based on Common Crash Scenarios for Teens
Simulated Driving Assessment Fuels Teen Driver Research

Further reading:

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